Techniques

Discovering the World of Kiln Glass Art

Kiln glass one of the most popular artforms in the world of glass art. As far as glass art supplies go, the kiln may be one of the most expensive items in your studio, but when used correctly, it can yield amazing results.

What is Kiln Glass

A glass kiln, much like an oven, heats up your fusible glass to the appropriate temperature to make it workable. When glass is warm is when the fun begins, allowing artists to melt layers and textures together in a variety of shapes and forms, making it an incredibly versatile tool.

The Art of Kiln-glass from Bullseye Glass on Vimeo.

The History of Kiln Glass

A fused bike collage by Robin Kittleson

A fused bike collage by Robin Kittleson

The art of glass fusing began somewhere around 2000 BC. Between around 1500 BC and 500 AD, Romans and Egyptians used kiln glass fusing as their primary glassworking method. After this, patte de ver and glassblowing became the primary glassworking methods.

It wasn’t until 1935 that warm glass began to reemerge, when craftsmen in America began using enamels on window glass in ceramic kilns. It wasn’t long before pioneers like Maurice Heaton began creating lighting fixtures and dishes the same way.

Then came Francis and Michael Higgins, who moved fused glass from a utilitarian craft and into the world of modern art. They invented what is now known as the dropout. As they continued to innovate, warm glass became more and more popular.

A wildfire was started. As fused glass workshops and studios emerged in the 1970’s and 80’s, and now kiln-fired works are emerging as a popular form of fine art, commanding a powerful presence in galleries around the world. The rest is history.

Masters of Kiln Glass

We regularly draw inspiration from innovative glass artists around the world. Whether you’re a kiln-glass enthusiast yourself or you’re just curious, you can discover some of them at http://edhoy.com/glass-artists/.

If you’re interested in getting a kiln of your own you can shop our selection of glass kilns at http://shop.edhoy.com/products/KILNS.aspx.

If not, no problem! Connect with us and we can fire it for you in one of  our classroom kilns. You can also register for one of our classes for a full range of tools and techniques.

Have a piece of kiln-fused glass to share? Don’t forget to share it with us on social media by clicking one of the buttons below!